A blog about Lamb Island in Moreton Bay, Queensland – a unique little paradise under forty kilometres as the seagull flies from Brisbane CBD.
Because of restraints on time, and let’s face it, only a limited amount of material on a small island, we’re now recycling selected earlier posts.
There’s not a comment facility, but if you have a question, you can use the email gizmo near the bottom of the right-hand column.

Monday, November 30, 2015

Natural selection.

It’s long perplexed me that small villages whose original raisons d’être were the prime agricultural land around them have over time sprawled into large towns or even big cities full of buildings and houses and fast-food outlets covering that self-same prime agricultural land, thereby taking it out of the food-growing equation. Surely it’d be more rational to build only on land unfit for anything else, and keep said agricultural land for food production, especially given escalating population growth.

(And a Spoiler Alert here: In my opinion, any populace that lets governments allow/encourage mining companies to destroy productive farmland in order to extract climate-changing short-term profits is a twist on Darwin’s natural selection principle: If a species isn’t smart enough to survive, it won’t.)

Phew. Okay, that preachy rant is by way of introducing (at last) the Subject For Today, our neighbour’s ‘Sustainable Urban Living Farm’. Even Lamb Island is an example of my opening bleat. Once home to productive small farms, albeit not hugely profitable ones by the time they were eventually bought up then chopped up by developers, the island’s rich volcanic soil is now planted, for the most part, with houses and lawns instead. But not all of it. On just two-and-a-bit Lamb Island residential blocks, one of our neighbours is growing an amazing variety of produce, from fruit and vegies to edible flowers, and doing it all as naturally and chemically-free as possible. But rather than me trying to do justice to his efforts here, we’ll all be better served if I point you to his excellent blog, ‘High-Water’, here. It takes a moment or two to open (well, on my computer anyway), but it’s well worth checking out.